Tag Archives: 1992

The Cure – From The Edge Of The Deep Green Sea (1992)

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The Cure’s 1992 studio album Wish succeeded some hard competition in the band’s acclaimed Disintegration. But from out of its shadow, the band produced a couple of gems: hit single ‘Friday I’m In Love’, of course; but the real deal is the jangling, dancey hook-laden ‘From The Edge Of The Deep Green Sea’, blessfully included as the longest track on the album.

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Sade – No Ordinary Love (1992)

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Sade

The 1992 album Love Deluxe was a high a high watermark for Sade. Not only because it was very successful both sides of the Atlantic, but also because she decided to withdraw her talents from teh studio for several years after its release. The opening track ‘No Ordinary Love’ is sensational and reset her audiences’ expectations of what soul could be. Sade gave us all the love she got and it was more than she could give.

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Pavement – Zurich is Stained (1992)

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Pavement 1992

I read somewhere that The War on Drugs’ Adam Granduciel first met erstwhile collaborator Kurt Vile at a Kurt Vile event. At that gig, Vile was was performing a very indie cover of ‘Zurich is Stained’. The song originally featured on Slanted and Enchanted, Pavement’s the classic debut album. Glorious memories from 1992.

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Sueño Latino ‎- Sueño Latino (Derrick May’s Illusion First Mix) (1992)

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Mr. Derrick May

Andrea Gemolotto, Claudio Collino, Davide Rizzatti, Massimino Lippoli, Riccardo Persi were the Sueño Latino collaborative that brought Manuel Göttsching’s ‘E2-E4’ back to the fore in 1989 with their self-titled italo-house cover. To judgemental ears, the track was simply ‘E2-E4’ plus Carolina Damas’s vocals. However, 3 years later, techno legend Derrick May remixed Sueño Latino and created something far more golden. A shimmering sound. In retrospect, I think 1992 may have been the high water mark in house music.

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Aly Us – Follow Me (1992)

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Eddie Lewis

Back in the day, Eddie Lewis, Kyle Smith and William Jennings (aka Aly Us) released ‘Follow Me’ through NYC’s peerless Strictly Rhythm label. There was something magical to the track. A standard bass line and a minimal piano riff soon develop into a track that’s as positive as house music would ever be, without becoming trite. Its standard 4:4 beat also provided a great level of respite from a dance floor that was getting ever more experimental in 1992.

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Blind Melon – No Rain (1992)

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Blind Melon

By 1993, Lenny Kravitz was not the only troubadour in town with hippie pretensions. Blind Melon singer Shannon Hoon would go one step further and become a drug casualty in 1995. But not before he had made his mark. Yes, ‘No Rain’ became a radio staple, but what many really remember is the music video of The Dancing Bee Girl – it became a defining image of the nineties. Have a good week.

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Crowded House – Four Seasons In One Day (1992)

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Crowded House

‘Four Seasons in One Day’ originally featured on Crowded House’s 1991 long player Woodface. Written by brothers Neil and Tim Finn, it was released as a single a year later. The song is about their home town of Melbourne. It reminds me of Los Angeles, but that’s another story.

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Pavement – Summer Babe (Winter Version) (1992)

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Pavement again

It’s winter my friends and never has an album opened with a colder start than the lyric “Ice Baby”. ‘Summer Babe (Winter Version)’ kicks off Slanted and Enchanted, Pavement’s impertinent and preposterously good debut album. Full of reverb and garage drums, the song was omnipresent during my last college year. Where Icehouse’s Iva Davies tapped into Bryan Ferry’s vocals, Stephen wanted to sound like Lou Reed.

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Black Moon – Who Got The Props? (1992)

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Black Moon

Apologies for late post – timings all over the place after an all-night shift. Last week’s bath in house music brought to mind a label that did not get a mention. Having already attracted house legends Roger Sanchez, Masters At Work and Danny Tenaglia to their stable within a year of launch, Reckless Records then successfully secured the rights to the underground marvel that was ‘Who Got Da Props?’. It was already a club hit, but with Reckless on board it became part of Black Moons’s classic hip hop long player Enta Da Stage.

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Black Science Orchestra ‎– Where Were You? (1992)

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Ashley Beedle

Demonstrating how house had already become fragmented into many different sub genres by 1992, Black Science Orchestra reworked the Trammps tune ‘Where Were You (When the Lights Went Out?) as their debut pressing. Much like Joey Negro’s work with Lifeforce in 1992, Ashley Beedle’s BSO were looking to keep the disco light alive in house. The track was released on Terry Farley and Steve Hall’s influential London label Junior Boy’s Own. I love the nostalgia in this tune.

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Coco Steel & Lovebomb – Feel It (1992)

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Chris Coco

The UK had quickly become the main market for the pioneering house music coming out of Chicago and Detroit. But there was no sense in the audience standing still. Club nights, DJs and record labels sprung up everywhere pushing the genre. Leeds played its part, with the city giving birth to its own Warehouse Club and Warp Records. The latter’s initial bleepy successes via Forgemasters, Nightmares on Wax, Unique 3 and LFO gave the label great confidence to blossom. CS & Lovebomb captured this intoxicating spirit. Just as Todd Terry’s Royal House was a eulogy to Mr. Fingers, ‘Feel It’ would use a Peech Boys sample as a tribute to Todd. Don’t Jerk It! Work It!

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Main Source – Fakin’ The Funk (1992)

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Main Source

I first came across Main Source as a featured act on Brand New Heavies’ 1992 venture Heavy Rhyme Experience, Vol. 1. “Brand New Heavies play the sh*t that/People used to listen to in ’70s Chevys”, says ‘Source’s Large Professor on the album’s opening cut. It was mutual appreciation. A year earlier, Main Source had walked a line in the face of the gangsta sounds that dominated the time to create a more conscious lyricism. Their debut long player Breaking Atoms features the nugget ‘Fakin’ The Funk’, which mixes in a huge slice of funk and carefully selected samples. A great sound.

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Sérgio Mendes – Fanfarra (Cabua-le-le) (1992)

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Sérgio Mendes

This batucada is even more celebratory than Airto’s classic rendition of ‘Celebration Suite’. ‘Fanfarra’ opens Sérgio Mendes’s aptly named long player ‘Brasileiro’. It was 1992 and it was the sound of a festival. Have a great New Year everyone.

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Golden Girls – Kinetic (Frank De Wulf ‎Mix) (1992)

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Golden Girls

Two years after looping the dance floor with ‘The Tape’ (off The B-Sides Volume Three), Frank De Wulf ‎remixes The Pied Piper’s ‘Kinetic’ into something even bigger. With the help of those orbiting Hartnoll brothers, the FdW remix of ‘Kinetic’ was released as a Golden Girls track on R&S Records in 1992. It was barely recognisable as a version of the original The Pied Piper pressing, apart from the ambient beginning that draws you to the edge … and then, bang – tune!

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Souls Of Mischief – Step To My Girl (1992)

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Souls Of Mischief

On ‘Step’, Vampire Weekend open with the line “Back back way back I used to front like Angkor Wat”. The song’s title and opening is lifted straight of the work of Souls of Mischief. Before A-Plus, Opio, Phesto D and Tajai struck gold with their debut album 93 ’til Infinity and its classic title track (which so deftly samples Billy Cobham’s ‘Heather’), the four band members had been part of the hip-hop collective group Hieroglyphics. The collective had recorded a demo that helped SoM secure their record deal with Jive. And you can understand why when you hear ‘Step To My Girl’. Again, the obscure jazz sample – this time it’s Grover Washington, Jr.’s ‘Aubrey’ – is a perfectly placed treat.

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